IMPACT OF TEACHER'S STUDENTS RELATIONSHIP AND THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN SECONDARY SCHOOL.

 

IMPACT OF TEACHER'S STUDENTS RELATIONSHIP AND THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT IN SECONDARY SCHOOL.  


CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

Background to the study

 The student-teacher relationships is one of the most important features in the context of learning. It is also one of the factors affecting student-teacher development, school engagement and academic motivation. Student-teacher relationships form the basis of the social context in which learning takes place (Spilt, Koomen & Thijs, 2011). Student-teacher interactions are not only influenced by a number of aspects including gender, but in turn also influence a student’s academic performance and behaviour (Roorda, Koomen, Spilt, & Oort, 2011). Supportive and positive relationships between teacher and students ultimately promote a sense of school belonging and encourage students to participate cooperatively in classroom activities (Hughes & Chen, 2011). One positive aspect about the above perceptions from literature is evidence that good relationships between students and their teachers are essential to the development of all students in school (Hamre & Pianta, 2001). In the report of Hamre and Pianta (2001), they posited that positive student-teacher relationships are a valuable resource for students. A constructive relationship with a teacher enables students to be able to work on their own because they know their teachers are there for them in case problems arise. They also know that such teachers will recognise and respond to the problem promptly. As children enter the formal school setting, relationships with teachers provide the foundation for successful adjustment to the social and academic environment (Hamre & Pianta, 2001).

Roorda et al. (2011) demonstrated that the quality of student-teacher relationships is strongly related to students’ motivation to learn. In the same vein, Nurmin (2012) found that teachers ensure more close relationships with highly engaged students. The association of teacher-student relationships is stronger with student engagement than with learning achievement (Cornelius-White, 2007). Self-determination theory also exemplifies on the importance of good student-teacher relationships. The theory argues that individuals have three basic psychological needs: the need for relatedness, autonomy, and competence (Ryan & Deci, 2000). The need for relatedness, or belonging, refers to a human being’s tendency towards wanting “to feel connected to others; to love and care” (Fosen, 2016). The need for belonging is so strong that individuals  seek to develop relationships even in adverse situations. The need to belong is a powerful motivation in itself, and that is why students who feel connected with and supported by their teachers are more likely to feel motivated to learn (Ryan & Patrick, 2001).

Student-teacher relationships are correlated with students’ intrinsic motivation (OECD 2013). Fredricks, Blumenfeld and Paris (2004) highlight three types of student-teacher engagement, namely emotional, behavioural, and cognitive engagement. They further said that it is useful for understanding why good relations promote intrinsic motivation. According to Fredricks et al. (2004), emotional engagement refers to students’ emotional reactions such as interest. Teacher warmth and attention to students can motivate students to participate in classroom activities. Such positive emotions drive student motivation (Skinner, Furrer, Marchand & Kindermann, 2008), and can therefore lead to behavioural engagement, i.e. when students cooperate by following rules and participating in learning activities (Fredricks et al., 2004). In line with the above, Furrer and Skinner (2003) believe that students’ participation can be externally motivated by wanting to please teachers, which means that students might seek teacher approval and attention as a reward.

When there is no student-teacher relationships, it is overtly characterised by conflict which may be damaging to students, more damaging than simply a lack of close teacher-student relationships (Murray & Murray, 2004). That is why Spilt, Hughes, Wu and Kwok (2012) argue that conflicting relationships with teachers cause feelings of distress and insecurity in students, thereby restricting their ability to concentrate on learning. Students with more conflictual teacher-student relationships had insufficient down-regulation of cortisol levels, meaning they were constantly more stressed than students with good teacher-student relationships (Murray & Murray, 2004). Educators’ relationships with students are equally beneficial to teachers, with research showing that good teacher-student relationships are positively correlated to teachers’ job satisfaction and effectiveness (Day & Gu, 2009; Fosen, 2016). Negative teacher-student relationships are a common source of teacher stress and burnout (Chang, 2009; Spilt et al., 2011). This is understandable when one considers the emotional labour that is part of teachers’ work, especially in relation to dealing with disruptive student behaviour (Chang, 2009). This could eventually lead to brain drain in the system.

 Student-teacher relationships have a great impact on students’ attitudes towards achievement. It is also obvious that if students are comfortable with their teachers and the school environment, positive relationships will be easily developed, which might benefit their social behaviours and skills. This is in consonance with Koen (2018)’s statement, that the development of interpersonal relationships, either between student and teacher or between students and students, is simply the keystone in building what individual learners want to achieve in both the classroom and life itself. From the above it can be deduced that student-teacher relationships are the emotional bond that exists between teachers and students in school. Both students and teachers have the power to shape and change the quality of these relationships (Sabol & Pianta, 2012). In the same vein Nugent (2009) suggests that by creating healthy relationships, teachers can motivate students during the learning process, which is one of the main objectives in a teacher’s practice. To make relationships between teachers and students easier, teachers must be aware of the students’ emotional and academic needs and must be able to work with it

STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM 

Over the past 10 years, research on student–teacher relationships has focused on the ways in which these relationships may affect students’ peer relations, parent–child relationships, academic competence, and social and emotional adjustment (for review see Pianta, Hamre, & Stuhlman, 2003). students who have difficulty forming supportive relationships with teachers are at greater risk of school failure. Poor relationships may be conceptualized as producing concurrent risk, with conflict between a student and teacher that leads to problems in the classroom during that school year, or chronic risk, with students developing a pattern of negative relationships with teachers over time. Unfortunately, most of the research on poor student–teacher relationships as a source of risk has focused on elementary school students. 

 

In the sight of the above problems, the researcher therefore intend to carry out this study in order to emerge with some empirical data relating to the extent to which poor teacher – Student relationship has contributed to the non effective academic achievement of  pupils  in IKERE Local Government.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY 

The main purpose of this study is to find out the impact of teachers  students relationship  on the academic achievement in Ikere local  Government.

Specially, the study intends to find out.

1.     The relationship between classroom engagement as a subset of student-teacher relationships and academic performance of secondary school students in Nigeria.

2.     The relationship between motivation as a subset of student-teacher relationships and academic performance of secondary school students in Nigeria.

3.     The level of interaction between teacher and students in the classroom setting as predictor of student performance

4.     If  teacher- student’s relationship have effects on secondary school performance?

 

RESEARCH QUESTIONS 

The following questions where formulated to guide the study

1.     What  are relationship between classroom engagement as a subset of student-teacher relationships and academic performance of secondary school students in Nigeria?

2.     What are the relationship between motivation as a subset of student-teacher relationships and academic performance of secondary school students in Nigeria/

3.     To what extent does  level of interaction between teacher and students in the classroom setting as predictor of student performance?

4.     Does teacher- student’s relationship have effects on secondary school performance?

Research hypothesis

The following null hypothesis were formulated to guide the study

1.     There is no significant relationship between classroom engagement as a subset of student-teacher relationships and academic performance of secondary school students in Nigeria

2.     There is no significant relationship between motivation as a subset of student-teacher relationships and academic performance of secondary school students in Nigeria/

3.     There is no significant relationship between  level of interaction between teacher and students in the classroom setting  and  student performance

Significance Of The Study 

This research work is being carried out on  teacher – Students relationship on academic achievement in Ikere Local Government Area. The work will go along way in helping all state holders of education which includes teachers, Students, parents and the entire system of education.

The researcher’s work will be of benefit to the teachers as it will serve as sense of direction to them by helping them to understand and know the reason why children perform blow standard, academically in IKERE. Also the work will be of benefit to Students as they acquire more knowledge which thereby changes the academic achievement from negative to positive based on the improvement in their relationship with them. In the case of ministry of education, they will benefit from their names being gazette in their magazine having recognized them for excellence. The ministry of education may as well give them grants to maintain the schools in all activities such as sports and other equipment required; thereby the schools would be a liability.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY

This study is aimed at investigating the  impact of teacher –students relationship on   academic achievement in selected secondary. The study cover five secondary schools in Ikere local government area


 

 

Reactions

You may like these posts

Post a comment

0 Comments